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How To Develop Team Chemistry

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This resource stems from a question submitted to the Ask PCA blog. Responses come from our experts including PCA Trainers, who lead live group workshops for coaches, parents, administrators and student-athletes.

"Can you provide some specific tips and tactics for developing chemistry among teammates on the youth football team I'll be coaching this fall?"

Response By Dave Cisar of winningyouthfootball.com
The first step is making sure you get to know everyone. You may know some of the players already, and you should commit to learning all the players' names by the end of your first practice. Smile and call every player by his or her first name; kids love hearing the sound of their own names. Too many coaches get to know the names of their athletic super star players that first day, but struggle for weeks to remember the names of their other players. Kids pick up on this in an instant and may feel de-valued.

Another chemistry-builder is a "question of the day." Have partners ask each other a different question each day (How many pets do you have? What food does your mom make that you think is disgusting? Who is your favorite NFL player?, etc.). At water breaks you call on each player and ask him how his partner answered the question.

A willing smile from a coach who knows and uses your name and a partner you talk to at every practice helps players feel wanted and part of the team. It can take time for kids to develop love or passion for playing on a team or in a specific sport. Creating a safe and welcoming environment can help buy you the time needed to develop that love and passion in all your players.

Download a printable version of this resource, including any additional commentary from PCA, by clicking the PDF below. To read more questions and answers like this, or to submit your own question to the Ask PCA blog, click here.

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