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Making Parents An Asset By Avoiding Parent/Coach Conflict

Making Parents An Asset By Avoiding Parent/Coach Conflict

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This resource is from a case study in Jim Thompson’s book, The Power of Double-Goal Coaching.

Making Parents an Asset: The last time you coached, parents were a negative influence that kept your team from achieving its potential. It’s a new season with new players and parents. As a Double-Goal Coach®, what can you do to avoid a repeat of last season?

Some coaches only want to coach kids, not deal with unruly or unreasonable parents. But kids bring parents with them. Here’s how to make parents an asset to your team by setting clear expectations and avoiding problem parents.

  • When your team has been formed, call players to tell them you are excited they are on your team. Then ask to speak to their mom or dad. Tell the parent that you look forward to working with them to help their child have a terrific experience this season, and that you will soon send a letter or e-mail explaining your Double-Goal (winning & life lessons) coaching philosophy.

  • Use a parent meeting to review the principles of Positive Coaching (ELM Tree of Mastery, Filling Emotional Tanks, and Honoring the Game). Ask them to promote these ideas with the team. Tell them you know your team will get bad calls, but ask them to commit to Honoring the Game no matter what.

  • Explain that the Emotional Tank and the ELM Tree of Mastery are research-based concepts that are keys to their child’s performance. Ask them to fill E-Tanks and reinforce the ELM Tree with their child throughout the season.

To read the full response with more tips on making parents an asset for your team, download the book excerpt found below.

To purchase the entire book The Power of Double-Goal Coaching, and to learn more about other PCA books, click here.

These books are used in PCA’s live workshops. To learn more about our interactive coach workshops, click here.

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